Software review series: Tor Browser

Back in the mid-’90s, when the US Navy was looking into ways to securely communicate sensitive intelligence information, a mathematician and two computer scientists emerged from the Naval Research Lab with something called “onion routing.” It was a new kind of technology that would protect your internet traffic with layers of privacy. By 2003, The Onion Routing project, acronym Tor, was in the hands of the public, where its vast network of users the engine enabling Tor has since continued to grow.

Today, thousands of volunteers all over the world are connecting their computers to the internet to create the Tor network by becoming “nodes” or “relays” for your internet traffic.

What is Tor?

At a basic level, Tor is a type of internet-connected network with its own internet browser. Once you connect to the internet with the Tor browser, your internet traffic is stripped of its first layer of identifying information as it enters the Tor network and is then sent bouncing through those relay nodes, which serve to encrypt and privatize your data, layer by layer like an onion. Finally, your traffic hits an exit node and leaves the Tor network for the open web.

Once you’re in the Tor network, it’s nearly impossible for others to track your traffic’s manic pinballing path across the globe. And once you leave the Tor network via an exit node, the website you view (assuming it has HTTPS in front of its address) isn’t sure which part of the world you’re hailing from, offering you more privacy and protection.

Because Tor is a volunteer-run network, speed can often be an issue. As your traffic moves from node to node, you’re likely to notice more speed loss than you would, for instance, with most commercial virtual private networks. This becomes particularly noticeable if you try to watch streaming Netflix content over Tor or make voice-over-IP phone calls or video calls with an app like Zoom. Tor technology isn’t necessarily built to provide seamless audio-video experiences.

Tor and plugins

Speaking of videos, there are also limits to the amount of privacy Tor can offer you if you enable certain browser media plugins like Flash. Likewise, your browser’s JavaScript plug-in which enables you to view a lot of websites’ embedded media can still leak your IP address information. Torrenting files with Tor also exposes you to privacy risks. Because of these risks, Tor’s privacy settings have these kinds of plug-ins disabled by default.

If you’re just looking to do general, daily internet perusal using a browser that will better hide your traffic from spying eyes, Tor probably isn’t the best choice due to its slow speeds and incompatibility with most embedded media. But if you’re concerned enough about privacy around a particular topic of internet research (and you don’t have a VPN), Tor is probably the best choice for you.

If you would like to read more helpful articles and tips about various software and hardware visit errortools.com daily.

On the other hand, if your computer is going through some system-related issues that have to get fixed, there is a one-click solution known as Restoro you could check out to resolve them.

This program is a useful tool that could repair corrupted registries and optimize your PC’s overall performance. Aside from that, it also cleans out your computer for any junk or corrupted files that help you eliminate any unwanted files from your system. This is basically a solution that’s within your grasp with just a click. It’s easy to use as it is user-friendly. For a complete set of instructions in downloading and using it, refer to the steps below

Perform a full system scan using Restoro. To do so, follow the instructions below.

  1. Download and install Restoro from the official site.
  2. Once the installation process is completed, run Restoro to perform a full system scan.
    restoro application screen
  3. After the scan is completed click the “Start Repair” button.
    restoro application screen
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